Thursday, June 26, 2014

Pretty Beaded Leather Bracelet

Photo via cs.jewelrymakingmagazines.com

Beaded Leather Bracelet
bracelet 8 in. (20 cm)
Materials list
18-20 4-6 mm rondelle gemstone beads
4 6 mm fire-polished beads
4 6 x 4 mm glass rondelles
12 4 mm fire-polished beads
40 4 mm bicone crystals
4 3 mm fire-polished beads
11/0 seed beads
   3 g color A
   1 g color B
   1 g color C
Fireline, 6 lb. test and 14 lb. test
Beading needles, # 11
Four-strand leather bracelet
Talk about to figure 1 for placement of the additions on the leather bracelet.
Photo via cs.jewelrymakingmagazines.com

Tubular netted tube
This tube will be stitched around an outside strand of the bracelet.
[1] On 1½ yd. (1.4 m) of 6 lb. Fireline, pick up nine color A 11/0 seed beads, wrap the beads around an outside strand of the bracelet, and tie the beads into a ring with a square knot, leaving a 6-in. (15 cm) tail. Sew through all the beads again.
[2] Pick up three As, skip the next A in the ring, and sew through the next A. Repeat around the ring, and step up through the first two As added in this round.
[3] Pick up three As, and sew through the center A in the next stitch of the previous round. Repeat around the ring, and step up through the first two As added in this round.
[4] Repeat step 3 for the desired length of the tube. If desired, stitch several rounds using color B 11/0 seed beads to make an interesting pattern. End the threads.

Wrap bracelet
This technique is used for the two center strands of the bracelet.
[1] On 2 yd. (1.8 m) of 14 lb. Fireline, wrap the Fireline around the first center strand near one end, and tie several square knots to secure , leaving a 6-in. (15 cm) tail. Wrap the Fireline around the same strand, and tie a half-hitch knot . Sew under the Fireline, and tie another half-hitch knot.
[2] Position a gemstone rondelle between the two center strands, and hold it in place with your non-needle hand. With the needle on the back of the bracelet, sew behind the first center strand, through the rondelle, and sew behind the second center strand.
[3] Bring the needle to the front across the top of the second strand, sew through the rondelle, and across the top of the first leather strand (figure 2), snugging up the thread.
[4] Repeat steps 2 and 3 for the desired length. End the thread by sewing between the thread and the strand several times and tying half-hitch knots.
Photo via cs.jewelrymakingmagazines.com

Beaded beads
My bracelet has three beaded beads using 4 mm fire-polished beads in the center, one using 6 mm fire-polished beads, and one using 4 x 6 mm glass rondelles.
[1] On 18 in. (46 cm) of Fireline, pick up a repeating pattern of a 4 mm fire polished bead and a color C 11/0 seed bead four times. Wrap the beads around the available strand on the bracelet, and tie the beads into a ring with a square knot, leaving a 6-in. (15 cm) tail. Sew through the beads again to exit a 6 mm.
[2] Pick up seven color A and B 11/0 seed beads, and sew through the 6 mm your thread is exiting in the same direction (figure 3). Push the seven 11/0s to one side of the 6 mm. Repeat this step on the same 6 mm, but push this new loop of 11/0s to the other side of the 6 mm (figure 4).
Photo via cs.jewelrymakingmagazines.com
Photo via cs.jewelrymakingmagazines.com

Wednesday, June 18, 2014

Kumihimo Friendship Bracelets




Kumihimo Series - A fashionable version of the friendship bracelets you dress in as a kid. Necklace and bracelets are made of a braided cord using the Japanese method of Kumihimo.* Beads are then hand-stitched on the braid. They are complete with a hook and a charm on the end to give them an adult feel. Wear bracelets set on your wrist just like you did when you were young! All pieces are one of a kind owed to the nature of their design.

*Kumihimo: The best projecting historical use of the cords by samurai as both a useful and attractive way to lace their lamellar armor and their horses’ armor (barding). Kumihimo cords are now used as ties on haori coats and obijimes, which are used for tying on an obi (kimono sash).

Friday, August 23, 2013

Finger Loop Braiding | Kumihimo Flat Braid

You may want to try the Finger Loop Braiding. I found this article a couple of years ago and decided to post here for those who are interested with fingerloop braiding just like the kumihimo braiding patterns we have discussed here.

(Original article from)
Fingerloop Braiding Workshop Blue Skies ’09
by: Gillian Woodruff

Fingerloop braiding has been practiced in various forms for thousands of years around the globe, reaching a peak of refinement in medieval Europe when silk braids were made for laces, purse strings and other adornments. The translation of some old English pattern manuscripts over the last 20 years has renewed interest in this method.

The braiding is performed with fingers holding loops of thread whose loose ends are anchored together. Loops are pulled through others by exchanging them between fingers in a specific way to produce a braided structure. A surprisingly wide variety of braids are possible using this method. Commonly, 5 to 8 loops are worked with 2 hands (although anywhere from 2 to 11 are possible) and larger braids can be made by having two or more braiders working simultaneously. We are starting with one of the simpler 5 loop braids in this workshop (Braid 1 below, the “double herringbone”).

Since a 5 loop braid has 10 interlaced threads, complex-looking braids can be made fairly quickly and easily(with a little practice). However, some downsides are: the worked length is limited by an arm-span (arms must be spread to tighten the braid after each move); the worker must be anchored to the work (although loops can be placed in a holder to pause the work); and it can be very hard to recover without error from dropped loops!

Setting Up A 5-Loop Braid
  • Cut 5 threads each approx. 1 m (40 in) long.
  • Align the ends and fold thread bundle in half; tug on folded end (the loops) while holding loose ends together to smooth out threads and ensure all loops are the same length.
  • Tie an overhand knot near the loose ends, and (optionally) another knot a pencil-width apart to create an anchoring/closure loop.
  • Anchor the knotted end to a fixed point (e.g. tree, rail, table leg, foot, toe…) with some string, or insert a stick to be held by a partner (or between your knees or toes).
  • Place one loop on each finger:
    • Left Hand (Lh): Index (A); Middle (B); Ring (C)
    • Right Hand (Rh): Middle (B); Ring (C)
  • Pattern guidelines:
    • Checks: group all dark colours on one hand, all light on the other
    • Stripes: place same colour on Lh A and Lh C
    • Gradations: place in lightest-to-darkest order: Lh A → Lh B →Lh C →Rh B →Rh C

Braid 1: Double Herringbone (or “Half-Round”) Braid


One of the easiest and most forgiving 5-loop braids. This braid is fairly flat (half-round in cross-section). One side looks woven while the other looks like two side-by-side herringbone braids. Hooking loop C from below as shown will twist the loop so that its lower thread becomes its upper thread after the transfer. The braiding moves are the same from the right and left sides:
Move 1.  Hook Lh C from below
  1. Rh: pass A through B, hook Lh C from below
  2. Lh: “walk down” loops (move loop on B to C, and loop on A to B)
  3. Lh: pass A through B, hook Rh C from below
  4. Rh: “walk down” loops (move loop on B to C, and loop on A to B)
  5. Repeat 1. – 4.

Braid 2: Square Braid


A more challenging braid because the picking index finger (A) must pass through BOTH loops on the same hand (B and C) before hooking loop C as before. The braid is square in cross-section, with a herringbone pattern showing along all 4
sides. The braiding moves are again the same from the right and left sides.
  1. Rh: pass A through B & C, hook Lh C from below*
  2. Lh: “walk down” loops
  3. Lh: pass A through B & C, hook Lh C from below*
  4. Rh: “walk down” loops
  5. Repeat 1. – 4.
*TIP for all moves like 1. & 3.: Use your thumb with A to help get the hooked loop back through B and C.

Braid 3: Split Braid

This is a great way to simultaneously braid two identical 5-thread herringbone braids, and only a few moves of this braid will create an opening for a closure or design interest. The picking index finger (A) must again pass through BOTH loops on the same hand (B and C) before hooking loop C on the other hand. However, the loop is now hooked by passing the picking finger A inside the loop C such that the bottom thread is below the picking finger A and gets hooked from above (instead of from below). Hooking loop C from inside as shown will keep the loop untwisted so that its lower thread remains so after transfer. The braiding moves are the same from the right and left sides:
Move 1.  Hook Lh C from inside
  1. Rh: pass A through B & C, hook Lh C from inside the loop (finger A is on top of the lower thread of loop C and hooks it from above)
  2. Lh: “walk down” loops
  3. Lh: pass A through B & C, hook Lh C from inside the loop (finger A is on top of the lower thread of loop C and hooks it from above)
  4. Rh: “walk down” loops
  5. Repeat 1. – 4.

Braid 4: Flat Braid

An attractive flat braid with the same fingerweaving twill on both sides. This is the most challenging braid of these four because the braiding moves are different from the right and left sides (non-symmetric): loops are picked from below on one hand, and from inside on the other hand. After braiding, flatten the braid by tugging the edges outward along the length of the
braid.
  1. Rh: pass A through B & C, hook Lh C from below
  2. Lh: “walk down” loops
  3. Lh: pass A through B & C, hook Lh C from inside the loop
  4. Rh: “walk down” loops
  5. Repeat 1. – 4.

Try This Book To Learn More About Braiding


Resources:
http://www.youtube.com/  Search for “fingerloop braiding” for some instructional videos.
http://fingerloop.org/  A great summary of the method and several patterns, maintained by some members of
the Society for Creative Anachronism (SCA).
http://www.stringpage.com/braid/braid.html A good summary of some basic patterns (in this workshop we
are doing what this site calls the “half-round” braid).
http://takvbowes.et-tu.com/  Order site for Tak v bowes departed - a translated medieval English pattern
manuscript.
http://www.lmbric.net/  A very interesting detailed technical summary of ongoing research on “loop
manipulation braiding” past and present.

Related Posts:
kumihimo square disk instructions
kumihimo stripe pattern
square kumihimo loom
stripe kumihimo pattern
kumihimo patterns with beads